Home Cars Vanderhall Venice first drive: three times the fun, or three-quarters?

Vanderhall Venice first drive: three times the fun, or three-quarters?

2 min read
0
0
75

There is a long and storied history of three-wheelers in the auto industry. Sometimes manufacturers of four-wheeled cars make them: Morgan has been making three-wheelers for over a century; Mazda made the Mazda-Go in 1931; in the ‘70s, Reliant made the infamous, flippable Robin. Modern carmakers have toyed with the idea of three-wheelers: GM developed the Lean Machine in the '80s; Peugeot unveiled the racy 20Cup in 2005; VW showed the GX3 in 2006 and made sounds like maybe it’d go into production (it didn’t); Honda still makes the cool little leaning Gyro scooter in Japan, and we even drove the articulating, tandem-seated Toyota i-Road in 2013 and liked it.

But mostly when a company makes a three-wheeler today, it’s a small startup looking to get around DOT crash-test requirements. Vehicles with three wheels count as motorcycles, not as cars in the eyes of the federal government. As such, they don’t require crumple zones, airbags or a lot of other high-dollar safety structures. Think of the failed Corbin Sparrow, the maybe-coming Elio, the coming-along Arcimoto, the still-selling Campagna T-Rex and the Polaris Slingshot.

The rear-drive T-Rex and the Slingshot have sporty pretensions, as does today’s subject, the Vanderhall Venice. It looks most like the Morgan three-wheeler. But while the Morgan has a 2.0-liter motorcycle engine powering the rear wheels, the Vanderhall has a front-wheel-drive GM powertrain driving its front wheels. 

Vanderhall Venice first drive: three times the fun, or three-quarters?

Load More Related Articles
Load More By Emma Martin
Load More In Cars

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Check Also

Mike Manley replaces ailing Sergio Marchionne as FCA CEO

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles on Saturday appointed Mike Manley to replace the seriously ill S…